The North Downs Way 100. Our fourth 100 miler and seventh event of the 2019 season and the ninth edition of what was our very first race, back in 2011. 

A record field of 283 starters and incredible conditions for August. Gone was the storm of 2017 and the excessive heat of 2018. We were left with a warm, but overcast day with light breeze dropping to an almost perfect overnight temperature of 13 degrees. The runners took advantage of this and much as per the SDW100 in June, the race saw not only highest starter number but also several other records. Highest number of finishers, highest finish percentage and our mens course record all fell. 

The mens course record has stood since 2013 and it's holder, Ed Catmur went off just behind the early group of front runners. It was this years NDW50 champion, Rob Payne, who set the course alight in the first half. His splits through Newlands mile 14.5, 1:45 and Box Hill, 3:00 flat were miles up on course record splits. In fact, they were within a couple of minutes of his splits at the NDW50 in May. Rob didn't slow down, he simply kept his foot on the gas and he emerged into Knockholt Pound mile 50 in 6:49 elapsed, just a minute down on his winning time from the 50 and over 20 minutes under course record pace. He looked slightly concerned but in control and took his time in the check point to ensure he had what he needed.

Rob Payne built a big lead early on

Meanwhile, Mark Darbyshire in second, had maintained a gap behind Rob of 15 minutes across much of the first half. He came in to the check point at mile 50, 15 minutes back but passed straight through and made up five minutes on Rob in one fell swoop. He looked focused and fast.

Closing the gap over the coming miles, Mark eventually caught Rob just after Bluebell Hill where running together for a short stretch, the two missed a turn and added a few minutes to their respective journeys. Quickly realising their mistake they backtracked and continued on, at which point Mark began to stretch away. His splits over the final marathon were absolutely exceptional as this first time 100 mile runner seemed to execute the dream race which eludes so many at this distance. He ran over the line in 15:18:41  elapsed to set a new course record by a huge 26 minutes. 

Mark Darbyshire running strong early on, during one of the exceptional all time performances at our events

How good a run was this? Given how long Ed Catmurs' time has stood, the calibre runners that have had a go at it and the difficulty and length of this course I think it's fair to put Mark's run up there amongst the handful of very best performances we have seen over the 9 years not just of this event, but all of our events. 

Behind Mark, Rob although slowing, ran home for a superb 15:46:19, just two minutes outside of the previous CR and good enough for third on the all time list. This was also his longest race to date. To have two guys coming through and racing to this level with relatively little experience behind them makes for a really exciting future. 

Third place went to George Darvell in 16:34, another younger runner who had a solid day creeping up through the rankings across the full distance. He passed John Melbourne in the third quarter of the race. John eventually ran home in 17:07 to continue making huge gains on the overall Grand Slam record. 

In the womens event, with Susie Chesher our all time fastest 100 mile finisher sadly not making the start line, the race was cast wide open. At Newlands Corner 14 miles in, Karen Hacker and Rebecca Lane arrived almost together, Karen exiting around a minute ahead. They both seemed somewhat shocked to be told they were in first and second but excited too and both looked comfortable. This was Karen's first 100 but after a podium finish at the WW50 last November where she looked strong, it seemed to be a real possibility from early on that she could run away with the win. She increased her lead over the rest of the field with each passing check point eventually making knockholt mile 50 in 8:51, with Rebecca slipping back during her third 100 of this season so far, and Linsdsay Hamilton and Kelsey Price coming through to second and third at the 50 mile point, 21 and 44 minutes back respectively. 

Through the 100km mark, Karens lead was over half an hour and from there she closed out to come home almost an hour ahead of the field and with the win in 20:40:38. Lindsay and Kelsey stayed in 2nd and 3rd respectively right through the second half also. Lindsay crossing the line in 21:37:19 and Kelsey coming home in 22:59:52.

Karen Hacker took the win in her debut 100 miler

In the age groups, Mark Darbyshire was MV40 winner to go with his overall victory. The MV50 award went to Andy Jones in 21:18 and Simon Bennett was lead MV60 in 27:53.

The FV40 prize went to Ema Nakajima, over from Japan for this race, in 24:20:09. FV50 went to Jeanette Rogers in 27:21:11. 

188 runners crossed the line, 58 inside the 24 hour barrier to earn their one day buckles and an overall finish rate of 66% - all were new records. 

Our thanks as always to the over 100 volunteers who made this race the success that it was. We will be back in early August of 2020 with the 10th anniversary of this event. 

 

Our first ever 50km event was an absolute blast. Starting at 11pm on Friday night, this night race which was supported by Petzl gave runners from a variety of backgrounds to experience running woodland trails at night. We had it all from first time ultrarunners through to regular Centurion runners, Grand Slammers and even a European Champion on the start line. 

The first lap, the racing up front was fast and frenetic in the mens race as a group of eight to ten extremely capable guys ran as an extended pack through the early miles. On the climb up to Go Ape at mile 5, things were fragmenting a little as the front two ran the climb and others backed off a little to keep their effort levels in check. The crowd at the top of the climb offered great encouragement in an otherwise silent woods. This was brilliant fun to behold.

Around the back half of the loop the front two continued to run the entire course and pull out a gap on others behind.

Rahil Sachak-Patwa was first in off of lap one, trailed by Dan Lawson in second, nearly three minutes back before five others all within 90 seconds of Dan, including the brothers Kevin and Mark Shannon off of a recent successful Bob Graham Round.

Dan Lawson coming in off lap one in second place

The second lap we were interested to see if Stuart Leaneys overall lap record of 1:21 would get taken down but in the end, nobody came near. Rahil was first in off loop 2 with a 1:28 lap split for 2:58 elapsed. Dan sat in second, now ten minutes back, and the Shannon brothers held a four minute gap over the rest of the field, running in 3rd/4th. Things stayed the same over the final loop as Rahil came bursting over the line for a win at the inaugural edition of this event in 4:34. Dan Lawson picked up second in 4:47 and the Shannon brothers holding on for 3rd/4th in 4:57. 

Rahil with his winners trophy

In the womens race the lead was held from the gun by Ewelina Wojtala who ran an incredibly consistent race with time splits at the end of each loop of 1:54, 3:54 and 5:59 for the win. She was marked closely throughout the entire race by Kat Barrett in second who sat five minutes back at end of loop two and closed the gap slightly to four minutes at the finish, coming home in a time of 6:03 elapsed. Third place went to Rebecca Paiser in 6:59. 

Ewinlina in her debut Centurion win

In the age categories, Dan Lawson won the MV40 prize, Paul Radford won the MV50 in 5:07, MV60 went to Peter Colwill in 7:31 and MV70 to John Fanshawe in a superb 7:34. 

The FV40 prize went to third place Rebecca Paiser and FV50 to Debra Bourne in 7:10.

Thank you to all of our volunteers who stayed out all night to get this one off of the ground. Great fun was had by all!!

 

The first and quite possibly only outing for a Wendover Woods 100. An opportunity for runners to attempt 10 laps of our Wendover Woods loop, making it one of the tougher 100 mile races out there and certainly a true test of endurance. We gave runners 32 hours to complete the course. With the looped format offering 20 aid stations and access to crew and drop bags every 10 miles, there was a chance for us as staff and volunteers to watch the race unfold as spectators, as well as offer the runners as much support as possible. This was all about making it just about the physical and mental challenge of staying out there when it was so easy to stop.

In the mens race, the king of Wendover Woods was attempting to finish his first 100 miler. Stuart Leaney has twice been Wendover Woods 50 champion and last November lowered his own course record to a phenomenal 7:17. He still holds the single fastest loop time of 1:21 set on his second lap of that event - a record that nobody in the 50km got anywhere near this year either which certainly says something. 

He began comfortably, holding right back, spending much of the loop chatting to Ian Hammett who after a win at the TP100 and a third place at the SDW100 already this year, was looking to add this one off event to complete our full calendar of 100s in 2019.

During the second lap, Stuart pulled away gradually and from there it was only ever a race between himself and the clock. Stuart shares the love we have for this course and it was the reason he was back. His form never really faded and he didn't seem to face the demons that make themselves known to most on 100 mile outings. His smile was ever present at the end of each loop and his transitions extremely efficient, wasting almost no time in check points. The gap over the rest of the field grew lap after lap and his 8:21 split for the 50 was extremely solid in its own right. As he wound in the final few laps he slowed but seemed to relish in the grind. It was simply a joy to watch someone execute a tough race the way he did. He crossed the line for the win in 18:56. The king simply staking an all time claim to the crown.

Stuart Leaney now has four of these

Ian Hammett ran strong through the first few laps but seemed to fade behind Stuart at an increasing rate over laps 5-8, suffering with a foot issue. That eventually ruled him out, half way around lap 9 and at 85 miles he sadly had to call it a day. He looks ahead to the NDW100 in three weeks time for his continued assault on the grand slam crown and the overall slam record. 

In the womens race, Mari Mauland our 2017 Grand Slam champion, led early on and retained a slender lead over Anna Troup during laps one and two, before the positions were reversed on lap three. Anna ran a strong race in from that point and much like Stuart, seemed to smile throughout. The attitude of both the eventual champions was exemplary. Although Anna looked comfortable for one of the coveted 100 Miles - One Day buckles, it wasn't a formality as the pace ineveitably slowed late on, but she eventually crossed the line in a superb time of 23:15 for the win. She also finished second overall.

Anna emerging into the dawn before going on to take the win

From the end of lap three Mari fought a long battle with stomach issues and with incredible determination stuck out the race to the bitter end, crossing the line for second lady in 26:15 elapsed.

Multiple past 100 mile champion Mari battled on to an inspiring finish

Third place was taken by Mel Horley in 30:49. Perhaps more than anyone all day, Mel looked like she had what it took to finish. She is another 100 mile slammer looking to add this fifth race to her achievements for this year. Her run was inspiring in its own way as she looked totally focused on the job at hand from beginning to end.

Second in the mens race went to James Mclaughlin in 23:38, another super run and another who looked strong throughout. Mike Lang took third place in in 24:17, at fourth overall the first runner to miss out on the Sub 24hr prize.

20 runners finished the race. Not our lowest ever finish percentage at a 100. That honour is still held by the 2012 Winter 100. But by far the lowest number of sub 24 buckles we have ever presented. 

What was great about the race is that with such a small group we got to spend a lot of time with each runner as an individual and became more and more invested in their own journeys. With the 50km taking place in the middle of the 100, it was surreal on Saturday morning to see the car park clear out and watch these warriors who had been going since the previous morning, continuing their battle long after most had worked a day, raced an ultra and gone home again. One observation of the final 10 or so finishers was that none were at the end of their tether. If they had needed to continue on, I truly believe any one of them could have. They had managed themselves well across the board and simply had that fight and determination to finish. It made it such a special race to watch. 

It won't be back next year, we are sticking with this as a 'one off'. But given the final sentiment it may be that we can be pushed into staging this one again somewhere further down the line.

Our thanks as always to a hardy band of volunteers who pulled some mega shifts to allow a very small group of people the chance to achieve something very special indeed.

 

The eighth edition of the South Downs Way 100 saw many of our all time records shattered as well as some wider scale records of note. For this year we moved our starting location to the incredible Matterley Bowl, just east of the true start of the South Downs Way. Runners met across Friday night and Saturday morning, most in driving rain, wondering if the forecast was going to change for race morning and afford them better running conditions for the race itself. 

It did much more than that. Temperatures were close to ideal not getting too warm in the day or too cold during the evening. Some were a little chilly on the ridge early on as the 40+mph south westerly winds cut through, but most managed to make the most of the golden opportunity that the following wind afforded. We welcomed home an astonishing 305 finishers, a finish rate of 81%, far eclipsing anything that we have seen before at one of our 100 milers. It was PB central down at Eastbourne at the end as runners came home absolutely over the moon with times and performances. For us it was such a pleasure to watch. Of course there is no such thing as an easy 100 miler and every one of those out on course still had to ride the incredible roller coaster that is racing over such a distance. We believe that 305 finishers in a 100 mile trail race is a record for the UK. Certainly LDWA 100s have eclipsed that total as walking events but as a running event this could be a record and we are very proud of that.

We also saw some absolutely spectacular racing. It's probably fair to say that the mens race this time, was the most exciting 100 we have ever witnessed at the sharp end of any race. The lead changed hands multiple times, with runners going back and forth, driving each other to new levels right from the gun. It came down to two protagonists at the end, duking it out on the final section of the course down through the town, less than a minute separating the two, both on the final 400m circuit of the track at the same time, coming home with the second and third fastest times we've seen on this course. To those who say that ultra distance events aren't exciting, this was all the proof ever needed against that.

We also welcomed home a female champion for the third time, picking up her eighth Centurion trophy in the process, once again making a truly miraculous return. Since winning the event in 2014, twice she has been in an ICU after major car/ bike accidents and made it back to better her previous effort each time. 

 

The Mens Race

376 starters made the new initial 3.7 mile route around the estate, before hitting the South Downs Way itself. The good thing about the new start is that supporters get a chance to see the runners in action three separate times before they get underway on the SDW proper and despite the early start and grey conditions we had a great atmosphere.

Immediately, some of the key contenders in the mens race were at the fore. Jon Ellis, our Grand Slam 50 record holder, GB internationals Marcus Scotney and Paul Maskell, Irish long distance champion Peter Cromie and reigning CW50 champion Geoff Cheshire all forging ahead early on. John Melbourne and Ian Hammett, first and second at the TP100 last month and looking for solid results in leg two of their grand slam assaults stayed further back seemingly comfortable to stick to their own race plans. 

We always look to Mark Perkins' splits at times like this, his 14:03 being still comfortably the best mens 100 mile performance we've seen, indeed it is still the fastest ever time for one of our 100s. The front runners seemed to be right on pace, but of course, Mark didn't slow down in the second half....

The lead group fragmented a little over the section to QECP mile 22 and the first major crew location. Paul Maskell and Marcus Scotney led the way, Paul's split into there was just 2:51.

Over coming miles Paul stretched away on his own and Marcus unfortunately called it a day prior to the fourth check point at Cocking.

Conditions late morning swung from blazing sunshine and pouring rain, but each burst seemed to last just a few minutes and didn't seem to slow anybody down whatsoever.

Sun then rain then back again

Paul looked strong making it through Cocking mile 35 in just 4:34, now trailed by Geoff Cheshire just 8 minutes back in second, the other initial lead group dropping back. With the exception of Ian and John the two Grand Slam hopefuls holding steady at 4:51 and 5:00 elapsed.

Views abound over the South Downs National Park

Over the more remote sections to Bignor Hill (mile 44), Kithurst Hill (mile 50) and down to the major 'half-way' check point at Washington, Paul ran ahead by himself, but Geoff stuck right on his heels, a gap which fluctuated between just 3 and 10 minutes at any given point. Behind Paul and Geoff, Jon Ellis unfortunately called it a day and Ian and John stepped into third and fourth, with John seeming to be holding the better pace of the two.

Geoff crept within sight of Paul at regular intervals and it was on the way to Housedean Farm at mile 76 that the two finally merged and ran into the check point together. At the same time, John forged past Ian with authority to move up into third place, all the while closing on the front two. Things were evolving and the race was on. 

Geoff was able to drop Paul and take the lead on the long gradual climb out of Housedean, Paul having a self-admitted low patch, but he is a true fighter and certainly wasn't done. He came back to Geoff and left Southease mile 83, just ahead of him. The gap stayed the same all the way to Alfriston at mile 91, where on the steeper climb over the top of the Long Man, the wheels finally came off for Geoff and with an almost complete engine failure as well as quad issues he was forced to a dramatic slow down. He eventually came to a full stop at Jevington with just 4 miles to go where he sadly dropped from the race. 

It wasn't a coast to the win for Paul at that point however, as the hard charging John Melbourne went on to deliver us the finest of finishes. He hammered his way through the second half of the course, taking vast chunks out of Paul and Geoff and then just Paul. 8 minutes better between Housedean and Southease. 5 minutes better between Southease and Alfriston, the gap of 11 minutes with just 9 miles to go seemed within his grasp.

Paul hit the road in Eastbourne with 2.5 miles to go first, John emerged just 40 seconds later, both of them running low 7 minute mile pace on the flat and fast finish. Jolted into reality from Neil Kirby, past champ who was cheering from the start of the road section, Paul seemed to be able to find that gear he needed and hit the track with a lead of just 60 seconds. John was so close, half way down the back straight as Paul crossed the line for a win in 14:28:53 over Johns' 14:29:57. The closest one two we have ever had. 

After Geoff dropped so late, it was Ian Hammett who picked up his second podium in two 100s with third in 15:17:52. 

 

Paul Maskell wins his second Centurion 100, adding to his Autumn 100 crown

 

The Womens Race

On paper, the womens field was almost as deep as the mens, with a simlar 5-6 possible contenders lining up on race morning. Much like the mens it took a brave person to call what the final outcome was likely to be.

From the first lap of the bowl, last years NDW100 champion, Norwegian Ingrid Lid ran from the front, with Sarah Morwood sitting back in second, shadowed by Michelle Maxwell. 2013 SDW50 champ Eddie Sutton in fourth, taking things out at her own pace.

Ingrid Lid led the way in the first third of the race

Ingrid led the way through QECP mile 22 in 3:24 a really strong start and looked comfortable. Behind her Sarah ran through in 3:29, Michelle close by in 3:32. Eddie Sutton coming in with a niggling foot injury back in fourth at this point was then forced to drop shortly after leaving those three to duke things out over the next 40 miles. 

By Cocking mile 35 the gaps had all but disappeared, things were shaping up just the way we had hoped with superb racing from our front three. Ingrid led the way in 5:39, Sarah a minute back and Michelle just 2 minutes further behind. But, there was a long way to go and things would shake up considerably from there.

If you want to look to one of the toughest competitors out there, one need look no further than Sarah Morwood. Her consistency is incredible. For the past several years as she has gone on to represent her country on the trails, she has taken things to the next level and maintains performance race after race. Her splits through the aid stations this year were within 2 or 3 minutes of her run from 2017 where she came home in 17:30. Which was six minutes faster overall than her 2014 win in 17:36. She knows where to gauge her effort and there's never any doubt that she'll hold it during the second half of the race. By Mile 44 she had edged ahead of Ingrid and quite simply ran away from everyone at that point. When Ingrid sadly had to drop at the 100km mark, it left Sarah with a gap already half an hour over the rest of the field. By the finish in Eastbourne she had extended that to over two hours, coming home in 17:29. A class performance and a confidence boost for her as she goes on to the 24 hour World Champioships in October. This was Sarah's 8th Centurion trophy and in typical Sarah fashion she gave her prize straight back to us to give out to the final female finisher as she has done in the past with some of her trophies.

Sarah Morwood, three time SDW100 champion

Behind Sarah, Michelle Maxwell running in her first 100 came home with a solid second place in 19:31:52, never challenged from those behind. And after some changing of hands between Rebecca Lane and Samantha Lloyd, it was Samantha who took home third in 21:24:40. 

 

Age Categories

In the womens race, Michelle Maxwells second place was also good enough for the FV40 win. Tracy Owen won the FV50 award in a superb 22:59. 

In the mens, Paul Maskells' win was also a MV40 record. Rick Curtis took fourth overall and just missed out on the MV50 record, in 15:59. Bob Empson's 23:18 was good enough for the V60 win and Keith Simpson was our first and only MV70 finisher in 26:21. 

Keith Simpson, MV70 winner with daughter and pacer Cat

One final mention, Ian Cullingworth one of our Grand Slammers in 2013 returned to racing after an absence of six years, during which he fought an aggressive form of skin cancer which left him unable to run. He not only made it back to the start line via a 50 mile qualifier earlier this year, but made it to the finish in a time of 22:33. It was one of the highlights of the weekend for sure.

Final words for our 112 volunteers out on course. Nothing is ever too much trouble for any one of them. They are the lifeblood of our support and the sense of community at this race was higher than ever, which says a lot considering the increased starting field.

Thanks so much to all of them for making this another safe and successful race.

Near perfect conditions greeted 252 runners for the 9th edition of the North Downs Way 50. This course is such a favourite with returning runners. The fast first half with a minimal amount of climb deliver the majority of runners to the foot of Box Hill at mile 24, in super fast times at the front and with a significant buffer over the cut offs at the back. Then the real work begins. After Box Hill, runners ascend Reigate Hill before the check point at Wray Lane at the 50km mark. And the final 19 miles in from there feature many short sharp ascents and of course the more remote fields and trails of the final 5km. Flat, but never ending!

Both the men and women gave us superb racing to watch, right from the gun. 

In the mens, returning champion Stuart Leaney seemed to be a clear favourite coming in, but had elected to take this as part of a peak training week for his assault on the upcoming Wendover Woods 100, so he wasn't sure how he would hold out later in the day. Rob Payne fresh off some solid results in 2018 looked like he meant business right from the off. Paul Russhard who has tried every tactical approach there is to try to win this race, went off the front again as usual but held back much more than he typically has. These were three strong, powerful runners with the ability to go fast. Indeed the overall positions featured these three from the gun.

Paul Russhard and Rob Payne running together just after CP1 

They arrived at CP1 just 10km in together, but Rob stepped ahead with Paul having gone straight through and edging away over the next section, Rob didn't look back from there. He seemed to be working hard early on but it was clearly a sustainable level for him as he simply gapped the field increasingly across the entire race. By Box Hill CP3 he was 6 minutes up on Stuart and Paul who were running within a few seconds of each other. By Caterham Mile 38 it was 13 minutes to the same two behind. at Botley, 17 minutes before he eventually crossed the line in 6:47:57 for the win. Rob went 5th fastest all time on this course. Paul ran by far the best race he has had with us to finish 2nd in 7:01. His strategy of holding back a little in the early stages, running within himself and then pusihing hard at the end had paid off and that earned him  a thoroughly deserved podium place. 3rd place went to Stuart who admittedly struggled to find top gear but still ran home in 7:06. Neil Martin, leading the Grand Slam standings took 4th just a few minutes back.

Rob Payne with his winners trophy

In the womens race, the lead changed hands numerous times early on. Rachel Fawcett led things through CP1 at 10km in 54 minutes flat, with Charley Jennings who led at this point a couple of years ago hot on her heels. GB International Beth Pascall was just a minute behind seemingly more relaxed and comfortable. By Newlands, Beth had edged into the lead with Rachel, Charley and now Gill Bland all close behind. These were the four women we had expected in the lead up, to challenge for the overall positions. The next ten miles of the course across to the base of Box Hill are predominantly flat or descending and it was on this section that fast marathoner Gill forged into the lead arriving with Beth, Rachel just 20 seconds back. But Beths class on the hills shone through from this point as she ran the fastest second half of this event that we have seen in the womens race. 

Beth Pascall running in third place early on

She closed the race in from Box Hill in 3:59, good enough for 7:19 and a winning margin of 33 minutes. At the end, Beth had clearly run well within herself, with this a part of her training for Western States. A case of a job well done as she went off to a hen do in Somerset straight from the finish!

Rachel Fawcett earned a truly deserved 2nd place behind beth in a superb time of 7:52, becoming only the 4th woman to break 8 hours on this course. She really buried herself over the second half and finally, after five consecutive 4th places at our events, ran her way onto the second step of the podium. We were all delighted for her and the hard work paying off. Third place went to Gill Bland in her first 50 miler, just over a minute behind of Rachel in 7:53, another superb run. 

Rachel Fawcett went on to finish 2nd

Eventually, 236 finishers crossed the line under the 13 hour cut off from 252 starters, which made for a 94% finish rate. All records for this event - our highest ever finish rate in 9 years which spoke of how good conditions were.

The Age Group Awards went to Stuart Leaney (MV40), Eduard Egelie/ Vladimir Zalesskiy (MV50 Joint) and Nigel Stevens (MV60). In the womens race Rachel Fawcett took the FV40 award setting a substantial improvement in that mark with her second place finish, with Debra Bourne the 2012 Champion taing the FV50 prize. Carol Murphy ran home the FV60 winner in 12:40. 

Eduard and Vladimir finish joint first in the MV50 category 

As per the South Downs Way 50, it was Cat Marriot who left the real fireworks until the very end. With 45 minutes to go in the race, there were still 47 people out on course. People arrived home in groups and singles seemingly non stop all the way to 12:57 elapsed which left just Cat out on course. Cat finished the SDW50 last month, after 26 straight DNFs at our events. It was a truly emotional time for all involved. This time, with a view across the final field from our finish position giving us eyes on the final mile, Cat was nowhere in sight therefore we knew it sadly wasn't to be this time. Having left the final check point with 10 minutes to spare it was going to be a herculean effort for her to make this one. Yet with 13:00:10 on the clock she suddenly emerged into the final road and crossed the line in 13:00:42. But. She had performed what will sadly be known as a Gary Robbins at this point, having taken the shorter NDW100 route into the finish by accident, as well as just missing the alloted time. It was with a knowing smile that she lay on the ground breathing hard - she had as at the SDW50 given it her all, all day but had this time come up just short. The satisfaction of having given everything was clearly there and it was still great to see. 

61 Grand Slammers completed the race and the table as it stands is available here. Both Neil Martin and Rachel Fawcett have commanding leads in the respective mens and womens overall standings.

We move on now to the South Downs Way 100 which will be our biggest ever 100 mile starting field. We love the race so much and we look forward to some more stellar racing over the weekend of the 8th and 9th of June.

Final thanks as always to the 62 volunteers that made the race yet again the safe and enjoyable one that it was. 

A superb weekend of racing was had at this years Thames Path 100. Many records were broken as we watched some incredible stories and racing from up and down the field.

The day dawned cold but bright. The 309 starters eventually faced some cold showers through the early afternoon, mixed in with some sunny spells. Before a freezing night set in. Luckily with no rain or wind through the hours of darkness, most were able to cope with the cold on its own and of the 309 starters, 225 finished the event for 73% completion rate. By far the highest ever finisher ratio we have had at the TP100.

Both the mens and womens events turned out to be extremely close, hard fought races with some incredible back and forth along the way. 

Up front in the mens race, the early lead was held by course record holder and GB international Craig Holgate. Behind him, previous champion Ed Catmur ran just a couple of minutes back and there was much excitement about a possible return to top form for Ed. After the front two a group of four had formed early and stayed together through the early miles, that group including both Ian Hammett and Paul Beechey.

The 2019 TP100 gets underway from Richmond Upon Thames

Bright sunshine was interspersed with rain showers throughout the early hours

Within a few hours it was all change however, as Craig pulled over just after the marathon mark with an ankle problem he had suffered from in one of his final training sessions just a week earlier. Ed faded back a little and that left Ian Hammett on his own out front having stretched away from the rest of the bunch. Over the next 70 miles, Ian ran from the front in a confident manner and paced the race very well. But it was far from an easy ride, with John Melbourne running strong through the field from 16th at CP1 to 7th at CP3 and by the half way point at Henley aid station in 3rd, he was 21 minutes back from Ian. He looked strong and over the next 35 miles, closed the gap on Ian to just 9 minutes. The two were certainly both aware of the diminishing margin and both pushed as hard as possible to make it over the line first. Both of them produced pacing masterclasses, and it was only in the final nine miles where John lost a little power, and Ian found a finishing kick to run sub 8 minute mile pace over the last 10km, that the gap opened back out again. Ian ran home for a second fastest all time on this course of 14:36 and his first Centurion win. John crossed the line in 14:58 for second - the first time we've had two sub 15 hour runs at the same race. Third place was taken by Paul Beechey who also ran strong throughout and came home in 15:48.

The Grand Slam for 2019 already looks like a fascinating encounter, with Ian and John both looking to the overall series as well as the individual events. If both can continue to stay in form through 2019 it looks like we are in for some spectacular racing, and results. 

Ian Hammett collecting his winners trophy

If it's possible, the womens race was even more exciting than the mens. At check point 1 mile 12, Wendy Whearity going for her 19th Centurion 100 mile finish had the lead, with a group of 7 other women all within 7 minutes of her. At Dorney and the 50km mark, it was all change, as last years NDW100 champion Ingrid Lid had made her way through to head the field in 4:47.Centurion Ultra Team runner Debbie Martin-Consani was now just two minutes back and Wendy had briefly slipped to 5th place. Between Mile 30 and 44, the lead went back and forth between Ingrid and Debbie, but by Henley, mile 51, coming in in 8:11 elapsed, Debbie had a commanding 13 minute lead this time over Leanne Rive in 8:24 and Kelly Pepper and Ingrid both in 8:26.

Debbie Martin-Consani running in Centurion Ultra Team colours

Ingrid Lid traded the lead back and forth with Debbie across the first half of the race

By Streatley at Mile 70, Debbie held a similar lead of 13 minutes but this time over Ingrid who was seemingly back from the dead and closing fast. Also coming good again, Wendy sat just two minutes back of Ingrid. What would happen from here was anyones guess. Ingrid closed the gap to 6 minutes by Wallingford mile 77 and after Debbie missed the bridge at Benson for a short detour, Ingrid briefly took over the lead again with just over 20 miles to go. Arriving at Clifton Hampden mile 85 together, it was Debbie who exited the aid station first and turned on the gas to run home the victor in 17:40 elapsed. Her fourth win at a Centurion 100 mile event and her second on the Thames Path following victory on the flood course in 2013. Ingrid ran home second just 8 minutes later, with Wendy holding on for 3rd in 18:26. Truly superb racing on all counts.

Of the 225 finishers, 123 of those came in under 24 hours to take home the 100 MILES - ONE DAY buckle, with Ben Coleman sprinting home over the line with under half a minute to spare in what was one of the best moments of the weekend. 

Age group awards went to Debbie Martin-Consani (FV40) and Ian Hammett (MV40) - Ian setting a new record time. MV50 to Paul Radford in 18:01 and FV50 to Mel Horley in 25:08. And MV60 to Simon Bennett in 21:45. 

 

The 2019 season started with a bang this past Saturday with a classic April day on the South Downs Way. Dry weather, a cooling breeze and stunning views over the surrounding countryside. Whilst there are a myriad of stories as ever, within a finishing field of 354 runners, the two stand out results came from the womens race. 

At the sharp end of the field, Julia Davis ran off the front from the gun and produced an exceptional performance in what was her longest race to date. One of the fastest female marathoners ever to toe the line at one of our events with a 2:39 to her name, Julia was stepping up in her new ultrarunning career following solid results at two shorter events in 2018. This as we know, is a runners course. Last year we had seen Tom Evans and Sarah Morwood both take home Course Records. The slight headwind this year, unusual on this course, was a factor and we did wonder if it might cause a slow down for some later on, but not for Julia. Her splits were fast through every check point, as she began under course record pace and continued to increase her margin under that mark until the fourth aid station - arriving there 11 minutes under Sarah's 2018 split. It was enough, as she held on to be the first to break the 7 hour barrier in any of our events, coming home in a new best of 6:54:26. Julia hit the track with 3rd and 4th men still making the final circuit which made for an exciting finale!  Simply outstanding running and Julia is clearly a real talent to watch for the future.

At the polar opposite end of the field, Catherine Marriot was beginning her 29th event with us. Having finished the SDW50 back in 2014, Cat had started and failed to complete a total of 26 events in the interim period, coming in to this race. It takes a tremendous amount of determination to keep trying at what can be a very punishing sport. Throughout 2018 she improved, and it looked likely she would get a finish at the 2018 NDW50, before taking a detour close to the end and missing the final check point cut off with 7 miles to go. This time, Cat came in well trained, focused and ready. Whilst there were some 'serious yet encouraging' words had at check points between Cat and Staff in order to maximise aid station efficiency, Cat clearly wanted it and it became clear that she was doing enough to make it happen. With 8 minutes to go, she crossed the line to complete her third lifetime finish with us. A result and performance that sums up all that this sport is about and makes them such a special place to be whether it's welcoming home first, or last place. 

The rest of the womens race was equally exciting. Running second place all day was Amy Sarkies, our 2018 WW50 champ and she held on to finish in 7:22 which puts her at sixth on the all time fastest finishes for this event and gave her a new FV40 record. Behind Amy there was a great battle for the final podium spot. Consistent performer Rachel Fawcett went out strong and forged a small gap over fourth place Charmaine Horsfall who has had some great results on the Hardmoors scene. As the race unfolded Charmaine looked the most consistent of any runner, male or female and impressed everyone by powering through from 32nd overall at CP1 to 10th overall at the finish, taking third place in the womens race in 7:27. Rachel took another fourth place in 7:47. Another podium surely beckons for her soon. 

Much as in the womens race, the eventual mens winner, also a superb marathon runner led from the gun and produced a consistent display. Ben Parkes came into this race with his ultra career to date, not quite matching the calibre he has shown over the shorter road races - a 2:25 marathoner it was clear if he kept working at the long stuff it would finally click. The mens field was competitive and it was clear that Mark Innocenti who was second at last years NDW50, was not going to give up without a fight, sticking close to Ben throughout. But the gap grew by just a minute or two at each check point and with time running out, Ben was able to finish strong on the flat road section through Eastbourne, to cross the line in 6:35:49. Mark took second in 6:48:21 and Steve Hobbs was able to hold off a closing Ben Osborn by just 32 seconds to take third in 6:53 and scored a new MV40 record in the process.

Age group awards went to Steve Hobbs (MV40), Rick Curtis (MV50) - Rick improved his own MV50 record here and now holds the top three fastest times in his category - David Prince-Iles (MV60) and in the womens race Amy Sarkies (FV40), Rose Williams (FV50) and Heidi Grant (FV60).

Congratulations to all of our 354 finishers. Our thanks as always to the 70 volunteers that made this another safe and successful event. We are excited to get the 100 mile season going in just under four weeks time at the Thames Path 100. As always, follow along on the day at the Live Link that will appear on the homepage from 0930 Saturday May 4th.